Project 400

Instructions and How-to from members. Safety posts.
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BobA
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Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2008 2:11 am

Project 400

#1

Post by BobA »

Since my "Project 129" was so well-received, I thought I'd chronicle my next FFR - the Model 400 stove. Here are some "before" photos of the stove.


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Now, one of the first things that I usually do is check the inside of the tank to see how badly it's rusted / corroded. However, though it's a bit tough to see, because the tank is so small and the pump is 180° across from the filler, all you can see through the filler is the pump tube.
I usually use a tube and suck out any remaining fuel at the bottom of any tank, but, that's not going to happen here. You can't get anything past that pump tube.

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Well, let's get started. First we remove the screws holding the generator bracket.

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The bracket lifts right off.

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Now, we loosen the jamb nut...

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and lift off the generator.

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The grate (such that it is) lifts off next.

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Removing the center screw on the burner...

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and the burner cap & rings.

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The burner bowl is next.

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Now, we're down to the burner box assembly...

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There are 3 screws to remove in order to free the burner box. One on the top, and one on each side at the bottom. Then the assembly can be lifted off of the tank.

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After removing the assembly, I looked down inside it and noticed what I originally thought was some kind of insect nest or egg sac. However, upon closer examination, they are actually 2 pieces of a fiberglass insulation.

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The reason for them is unclear to me. I first thought that they might be heat insulation to help keep the tank & fuel cooler. Another thought I had was that Coleman used fiberglass insulation in the support tube of their catalytic heaters. A primary purpose of that was to catch & hold any condensation when the unit cooled, where it could vaporize the next time it was lit, rather than collect & rust out the tank and tube. Perhaps they serve a similar function here, so as not to rust out the burner box. Who knows? Maybe they serve both functions.It was touchy to finagle them out of the burner box without completely destroying them, but I did it. What a mess!

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Now, on to the pump. Pretty standard stuff!

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This stove was made in 1979. I was very pleased to see that the stove had a leather pump cup! For some reason, I was expecting neoprene. It was in like new condition, as well!

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We now move on to the valve assembly. I don't know what Coleman started using for sealer, but it seems like every lantern & stove approximately post-1975 uses a thread sealer that is impossible to move unless it is heated first. And that is what I had to do here - heat the valve with a torch, then put the valve body in the vice and unscrew the tank. Since I don't have 3 hands, and I needed 2 to do this. I have no pictures of that. Sorry!

In any case count the number of turns to unscrew it. You'll put it back in the same position later.

I pick it back up with removing the valve from the tank after loosening...

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The valve looks like it hasn't been used. Only very slight age corrosion of the brass, but no crud or sludge. The inside of the tank (which I could finally see after valve removal) looked like it just came out of the box.

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The F/A tube does not screw down flush to the valve body like on most lanterns & stoves. This actually must be screwed to the correct position. I'll cover that later. For now, just note that the F/A nut (on top) appears to have an index mark on the flat facing us here. As you can see it aligns with the corner of the valve body. Note this and count the turns as you unscrew it.

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This stove uses a schrader valve at the top of the F/A tube as the "on/off" valve. Here I'm unscrewing it with a proper tool.

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Here is the F/A tube completely dismantled. You will see that the concept used by this stove is identical to that used by the original 275 lantern. That is, a schrader valve on top of a F/A rod & spring. Check out Terry Marsh's site to see an exploded view of the 275's valve.

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Moving on, here I'm removing the gas tip from the generator.

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Getting ready to give the brass parts the lemon juice soak...

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...and in they go.

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Here they are after about a half-hour soak, and a light polishing with 0000 steel wool.

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Here are the steel burner parts in for their hot soak & de-rusting.

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Now, we can re-assemble the valve. First we drop the F/A rod & spring into the F/A tube.

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Next, the schrader valve, and screw it down snugly.

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I've screwed the F/A tube into the valve body using the number of turns previously noted when dismantling it, and aligning the index mark as it was. In order to check and be sure that the valve will work properly, we check it in the 3 positions of operation - OFF, LIGHT. & RUN. Here is the OFF position. You see that the end of the F/A rod is just about flush with the end of the tube. Try to blow air through the valve from the generator end. It should be impossible!

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This is the LIGHT position. It should be possible to blow air through the valve, and the large portion of the F/A rod should be in the orifice as shown.

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The ON position. You should be able to blow air through, but now the stepped (small diameter) part of the F/A rod is in the orifice.

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If the valve works as above, it's all set. If not, it might require that you turn the F/A tube in or out of the valve body to adjust.A little Permatex #2 sealer on the threads...

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...and we screw the valve back into the fount (the same number of turns as when removed).

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Now the pump has been re-installed. I want to point out that since the check valve is operating just fine, I did not remove it. If it ain't broke...

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Here are the steel parts, after their de-rusting soak, some work with Dremel brushes and some steel wool polishing.

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The burner box insulation after cleaning was worked back into place.

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Now it's time to re-assemble the burner. We first put the burner box assembly in place and secure it with its 3 screws.

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The burner bowl is next...

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...followed by the burner rings. We start with a flat ring...

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...then a wavy ring.

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Continue to alternate rings - you should end with a flat ring.

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Now the burner cap...

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...and the screw. When tightening the center screw, "pinch" the rings from the sides, all the way around as you tighten. You are trying to keep the rings & cap centered and as concentric as possible.

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After laying the grate back in place on the burner, we now install the generator. Here I'm finger-tightening the jamb nut.

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The generator bracket and screws are next.

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Finish tightening the jamb nut.

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The stove is completed!

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Here she is burning...

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THE END
BobA
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hiddenhider
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Project 400

#2

Post by hiddenhider »

You've done it again Bob.

Another great post.
Thanks, John

Arlington, TX home of the carbon boot print.
hurricaner
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Project 400

#3

Post by hurricaner »

Bob, next time a few more pics,LOL. Nice job.

Sam
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vmax29
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 5:12 pm

Project 400

#4

Post by vmax29 »

Bob, Thanks for posting that. Nice work!
Sean

Jackson NJ
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McGrath512
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 4:29 pm

Project 400

#5

Post by McGrath512 »

Great job. Well done. One note, always remember, silly wabbit, Trix are for kids!



Brian
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spydoc95
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Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 9:13 pm

Project 400

#6

Post by spydoc95 »

Nice job!!!! I have never had the patience to snap that many pics during an FFR and because you did I thank you! Someone should put this tutuorial in the archives

brucesheehe
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Title: ECCENTRIC BLOCKHEAD

Project 400

#7

Post by brucesheehe »

Great Job

Bruce Sheehe, aka ECCENTRIC BLOCKHEAD
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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Murff
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Title: Guy Who Knows Just Enough To Cause Trouble

Project 400

#8

Post by Murff »

Bob!

Great Tutorial-Pictorial!

As with your Project 129, could we move this thread to the How-To Forum in a few days?

Murff
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Name: Murff   ICCC Member #726 
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BobA
Senior Member
Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2008 2:11 am

Project 400

#9

Post by BobA »

Thank you all for the kind compliments. If these tutorials prove to be of help to anyone, then I've done what I set out to do.


Murff wrote:
As with your Project 129, could we move this thread to the How-To Forum in a few days?



Murff - please do!

BobA




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Bricklayer
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Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 1:30 am

Project 400

#10

Post by Bricklayer »

I do not own a stove like this but I thoroughly enjoy the step by step pictures and detailed explanations, I take great joy in learning how things work, I have learned allot from these tutorials.
Thank you for the time you invested in this great post.
Ben
You meet thousands of people and none of them really touch you, and then you meet that one person, and your life is changed forever.

Ben
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